Giving Tuesday – Why It Matters

As we get closer to the end of the year, it’s only natural that people get into the giving spirit. People have days off of work to spend it with their closest and friends and family and show them how much they mean to them. 

However, underneath this cozy blanket of generosity lies the prickly sheet of consumerism and mass production. 

While you want to make your friends and family feel appreciated, many people are pelted with commercials from every media possible to buy the latest and greatest. In many places, Black Friday and Cyber Monday have become sacred holidays, while the traditional days go overlooked. 

While these days center around consumerism and encouraging the masses to “shop til’ you drop”, there is one day that cuts through the muddled retail waters.  That’s right, it’s Giving Tuesday.

While you may have heard the phrase being thrown around in years past, you might be wondering what it means and what happens on this special day. 

To satisfy your curiosity, we’ve put together a quick overview of the ins and outs of Giving Tuesday and how you can get into the giving spirit too. 

What Is Giving Tuesday?

The first Giving Tuesday occurred in 2012. The day was created as a global movement to encourage people to be more generous towards organizations in their community to help make a change. 

Founded by New York’s 92nd Street Y in collaboration with the United Nations Foundation, it typically falls on the first Tuesday after Thanksgiving. This year, Giving Tuesday will fall on December 1, 2020.

The Origin of Giving Tuesday

Giving Tuesday was created in response to celebratory days of consumerism like Black Friday and Cyber Monday. At its inception, Giving Tuesday was typically seen with a hashtag (#GivingTuesday), as social media was intended to be the driving force of the movement. 

The creators hoped that social media would grow this idea of giving into an international movement. Fast forward to eight years later, to say this idea worked would be an understatement. 

Every Giving Tuesday since 2012 has grown exponentially and set records. We imagine that this year will be no different.

Who Can Participate in Giving Tuesday?

Anyone can participate in Giving Tuesday! Giving Tuesday was built from a foundation of individuals, nonprofits, schools, students, small businesses, corporations, religious organizations, and families. People all over the world participate in Giving Tuesday every year. 

You don’t need to have a special title to participate, you just need to have the spirit of giving. This can be done by giving your time, your voice, or your abilities towards making the world a better place.

How Can I Participate in Giving Tuesday?

There are countless ways for you to participate in Giving Tuesday. As long as you’re helping people in need and advocating for causes you care about, you’re doing plenty! 

If you’re looking for more specific ways to participate, here are few ideas:

  • Volunteer virtually or in-person
  • Perform an act of kindness to essential workers
  • Use your social media platforms to spread the word
  • Use the #GivingTuesday hashtag in your tweets and Instagram posts
  • Advocate for a cause that is important to you 
  • Contact a local Giving Tuesday movement to find out how you can help

Is Giving Tuesday Only About Donating Money?

Not at all! As we mentioned earlier, you can be a part of Giving Tuesday without donating any money. Whatever you decide to do, the main idea is to keep the giving spirit flowing long after the holiday season has ended. 

If this is your first Giving Tuesday, we hope that you’ll keep it going and share it with others. Find ways in your everyday life to spread acts of kindness and create a sense of community where you live.

How To Get The Most Out Of Giving Tuesday

If you’re currently advocating for a non-profit or organization, you might be wondering how you can make the most out of this year’s Giving Tuesday. Here are a few tips to get the most out of your campaign.

Contact Loyal Supporters

The first step to engaging with your audience is to contact your loyal supporters. You might do this through social media or an email list. Write up a special message bout Giving Tuesday and what it means for your organization and the community. 

Include specific examples to show them the potential impact of their donations. You can also mention the success of past campaigns and what it helped the organization accomplish. You’ll appeal to their hearts, and they’ll be sure to respond positively.

Use Social Media To Your Advantage

We established that Giving Tuesday is a huge event on social media, so don’t miss on creating an online presence. Use the #GivingTuesday hashtag in your posts leading up to your event and drum up some curiosity. 

Let your followers see how you will be involved and what you have planned for the day. You can even publicly thank those who have already donated to help get the ball rolling for others.

Bring Your Event To Life

Whether you choose a public or virtual event, sharing your event will help it come to life. Don’t be afraid to go live or share pre-recorded videos. Share updates about your donation goals with your followers and keep them in the loop all day long. Even if your event is virtual, your supporters will feel like they’re right there in the room with you.

Why Is Giving Tuesday Important?

Besides the numbers, Giving Tuesday is important because of the meaning behind the movement. During the holidays, many people lose sight of what is truly important due to the growing influence of consumerism. 

Giving Tuesday helps to create a community-centered environment, looking out for those in need. Connecting this movement to social media makes our world a bit smaller, and creates a larger platform in which missions can be promoted, donations can be given, and gifts can be shown to encourage others. 

Positive peer pressure, support from the community, and a strong online presence easily makes this one of the most selfless days of the year.

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